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Test Bank Motor Learning And Control Concepts And Applications 11th Edition by Richard A Magill

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Test Bank Motor Learning And Control Concepts And Applications 11th Edition by Richard A Magill

Test Bank Motor Learning And Control Concepts And Applications 11th Edition by Richard A Magill

Chapter 01 The Classification of Motor Skills Answer Key

Multiple Choice Questions
 

1.

A researcher from the area of __________ would be interested in how massed versus distributed practice influences the acquisition of a skill: 
 

A. 

Motor Control

 

B. 

Motor Learning

 

C. 

Motor Development

 

D. 

None of these

 

 

Accessibility: Keyboard Navigation
Topic: Discussion
 

 

2.

The performance of any motor skill is influenced by characteristics of: 
 

A. 

The performer

 

B. 

The environment

 

C. 

The skill itself

 

D. 

All of these

 

 

Accessibility: Keyboard Navigation
Topic: Discussion
 

 

3.

The term skill is used to denote: 
 

A. 

A task that has a specific purpose or goal to achieve

 

B. 

The degree of competence or capacity to perform a task

 

C. 

The activity in nervous system that underlies movement

 

D. 

A and B

 

 

Accessibility: Keyboard Navigation
Topic: Discussion; Skills, Actions, Movements, and Neuromotor Processes
 

 

4.

Which of the following is NOT a characteristic of skills and actions: 
 

A. 

They are innate

 

B. 

There is a goal to achieve

 

C. 

They are performed voluntarily

 

D. 

They require movement of joints and body segments

 

 

Accessibility: Keyboard Navigation
Topic: Discussion; Skills, Actions, Movements, and Neuromotor Processes
 

 

5.

Locomotion is an example of which of the following terms? 
 

A. 

Movement

 

B. 

Ability

 

C. 

Performance measure

 

D. 

Action

 

 

Accessibility: Keyboard Navigation
Topic: Discussion; Skills, Actions, Movements, and Neuromotor Processes
 

 

6.

The specific pattern of limb motions used in throwing a ball is an example of: 
 

A. 

An action

 

B. 

A movement

 

C. 

A neuromotor process

 

D. 

A reflex

 

 

Accessibility: Keyboard Navigation
Topic: Discussion; Skills, Actions, Movements, and Neuromotor Processes
 

 

7.

The relationship between movements and actions is: 
 

A. 

Many-to-one

 

B. 

One-to-many

 

C. 

Many-to-one and one-to-many

 

D. 

Movements and actions are not related

 

 

Accessibility: Keyboard Navigation
Topic: Discussion; Skills, Actions, Movements, and Neuromotor Processes
 

 

8.

The relationship between neuromotor processes and movements is: 
 

A. 

Many-to-one

 

B. 

One-to-many

 

C. 

Many-to-one and one-to-many

 

D. 

Movements and actions are not related

 

 

Accessibility: Keyboard Navigation
Topic: Discussion; Skills, Actions, Movements, and Neuromotor Processes
 

 

9.

Motor control and learning are prioritized in the following order relative to the three levels of study: 
 

A. 

Neuromotor processes, movements, actions

 

B. 

Neuromotor processes, actions, movements

 

C. 

Actions, movements, neuromotor processes

 

D. 

Actions, neuromotor processes, movements

 

 

Accessibility: Keyboard Navigation
Topic: Discussion; Skills, Actions, Movements, and Neuromotor Processes
 

 

10.

If a motor skill requires the use of large musculature and does not require precision of movement for successful performance, then the skill would best be classified as a: 
 

A. 

Fine motor skill

 

B. 

Gross motor skill

 

C. 

Discrete motor skill

 

D. 

Open motor skill

 

 

Accessibility: Keyboard Navigation
Topic: Discussion; One-Dimension Classification Systems
 

 

11.

The triple jump is a track and field event that requires a performer to run down a runway and then to perform a hop, skip, and jump sequence. The hop, skip, and jump portion sequence of the event is an example of a: 
 

A. 

Discrete motor skill

 

B. 

Continuous motor skill

 

C. 

Serial motor skill

 

D. 

Open motor skill

 

 

Accessibility: Keyboard Navigation
Topic: Discussion; One-Dimension Classification Systems
 

 

12.

Which of the following skills is a discrete motor skill? 
 

A. 

Riding a bicycle

 

B. 

Swimming the crawl stroke

 

C. 

Steering a car on a highway

 

D. 

Striking a typewriter key

 

 

Accessibility: Keyboard Navigation
Topic: One-Dimension Classification Systems
 

 

13.

Shifting from second to third gear in a car is an example of which type of motor skill? 
 

A. 

Open motor skill

 

B. 

Fine motor skill

 

C. 

Serial motor skill

 

D. 

Continuous motor skill

 

 

Accessibility: Keyboard Navigation
Topic: Discussion; One-Dimension Classification Systems
 

 

14.

Motor skills that require the performer to initiate a specific action on an object according to the object's motion are best categorized as: 
 

A. 

Open motor skills

 

B. 

Closed motor skills

 

C. 

Discrete motor skills

 

D. 

Continuous motor skills

 

 

Accessibility: Keyboard Navigation
Topic: Discussion; One-Dimension Classification Systems
 

 

15.

Which term is sometimes used synonymously with the term closed motor skills? 
 

A. 

Other-paced motor skills

 

B. 

Externally-paced motor skills

 

C. 

Forced-paced motor skills

 

D. 

Self-paced motor skills

 

 

Accessibility: Keyboard Navigation
Topic: Discussion; One-Dimension Classification Systems
 

 

16.

Gentile's taxonomy of motor skills includes which of the following factors as part of the "environmental context" dimension? 
 

A. 

Intertrial variability

 

B. 

Object location

 

C. 

Object orientation

 

D. 

Body transport

 

 

Accessibility: Keyboard Navigation
Topic: Discussion; Gentile's Two-Dimensions Taxonomy
 

 

17.

Which of the following skill category distinctions is popular in textbooks related to methods of teaching motor skills? 
 

A. 

Gross vs. fine motor skills

 

B. 

Discrete vs. continuous motor skills

 

C. 

Open vs. closed motor skills

 

D. 

Stability vs. transport motor skills

 

 

Accessibility: Keyboard Navigation
Topic: Discussion; One-Dimension Classification Systems
 

 

18.

Returning a serve in tennis is an example of which of the following types of motor skills? 
 

A. 

Self-paced motor skill

 

B. 

Open motor skill

 

C. 

Closed motor skill

 

D. 

Stationary motor skill

 

 

Accessibility: Keyboard Navigation
Topic: Discussion; One-Dimension Classification Systems
 

 

19.

Regulatory conditions regulate: 
 

A. 

The spatial characteristics of a movement

 

B. 

The temporal characteristics of a movement

 

C. 

The spatial and temporal characteristics of a movement

 

D. 

The spatial and temporal characteristics of a movement and the forces that underlie these characteristics

 

 

Accessibility: Keyboard Navigation
Topic: Discussion; Gentile's Two-Dimensions Taxonomy
 

 

20.

According to Gentile's taxonomy of motor skills, which of the following describes the least complex skill? 
 

A. 

Regulatory conditions stationary; object manipulated

 

B. 

Regulatory conditions in motion; object manipulated

 

C. 

Regulatory conditions stationary; no object manipulated

 

D. 

Regulatory conditions in motion; no object manipulated

 

 

Accessibility: Keyboard Navigation
Topic: Discussion; Gentile's Two-Dimensions Taxonomy
 

 

21.

Riding a surfboard on multiple waves would be classified in Gentile's taxonomy as: 
 

A. 

Stationary environment, inter-trial variability, body transport

 

B. 

Stationary environment, inter-trial variability, body stability

 

C. 

In motion environment, inter-trial variability, body transport

 

D. 

In motion environment, inter-trial variability, body stability

 

 

Accessibility: Keyboard Navigation
Topic: Discussion; Gentile's Two-Dimensions Taxonomy
 

 

22.

A softball player throws pitches to a stationary, cardboard cut-out of a batter. The Environmental Context for the pitcher is: 
 

A. 

Stationary with intertrial variability

 

B. 

Stationary with no intertrial variability

 

C. 

In-motion with intertrial variability

 

D. 

In-motion with no intertrial variability

 

 

Accessibility: Keyboard Navigation
Topic: Discussion; Gentile's Two-Dimensions Taxonomy
 

 

23.

Based on Gentile's Taxonomy, to simulate the regulatory conditions involved in the game of softball, a coach would have players: 
 

A. 

Hit a ball from a stationary tee

 

B. 

Hit balls pitched by a pitching machine

 

C. 

Hit balls pitched by a live pitcher

 

D. 

Practice swinging without a bat and a ball

 

 

Accessibility: Keyboard Navigation
Topic: Discussion; Gentile's Two-Dimensions Taxonomy
 

 


Short Answer Questions
 

24.

An example of an open motor skill is ________. 
 

See text for several examples

 

Topic: Discussion; One-Dimension Classification Systems
 

 

25.

An example of a gross motor skill is ________. 
 

See text for several examples

 

Topic: Discussion; One-Dimension Classification Systems
 

 

26.

If motor skills are classified according to the stability of the environment, bowling would be placed in the category of ________ motor skills. 
 

closed

 

Topic: Discussion; One-Dimension Classification Systems
 

 

27.

Walking in a crowded mall makes walking a(n) ________ motor skill. 
 

open

 

Topic: Discussion; One-Dimension Classification Systems
 

 

28.

Serial skills are a form of discrete skills. What is an example of a serial motor skill? 
 

See text for several examples

 

Topic: Discussion; One-Dimension Classification Systems
 

 

29.

Archery and piano playing are two quite different skills, yet they can both be classified as ________ motor skills when the classification system is based on the stability of the environment. 
 

closed

 

Topic: Discussion; One-Dimension Classification Systems
 

 

30.

Whether or not an object must be manipulated is a skill characteristic in Gentile's taxonomy of motor skills that is included in the ________ dimension of the taxonomy. 
 

action function

 

Topic: Discussion; Gentile's Two-Dimensions Taxonomy
 

 


True / False Questions
 

31.

Shooting a free throw in basketball is an example of an open motor skill. 
 
FALSE

 

Accessibility: Keyboard Navigation
Topic: Discussion; One-Dimension Classification Systems
 

 

32.

Running is an example of a gross motor skill. 
 
TRUE

 

Accessibility: Keyboard Navigation
Topic: Discussion; One-Dimension Classification Systems
 

 

33.

If motor skills are classified according to the stability of the environment, bowling would be placed in the category of closed motor skills. 
 
TRUE

 

Accessibility: Keyboard Navigation
Topic: Discussion; Gentile's Two-Dimensions Taxonomy
 

 

34.

When we skate on a crowded ice rink, we perform a closed motor skill. 
 
FALSE

 

Accessibility: Keyboard Navigation
Topic: Discussion; One-Dimension Classification Systems
 

 

35.

If motor skills are classified according to the stability of the environment, removing groceries from a shopping bag would be placed in the category of closed motor skills. 
 
TRUE

 

Accessibility: Keyboard Navigation
Topic: Discussion; Gentile's Two-Dimensions Taxonomy
 

 

36.

Typing a word on a keyboard is an example of a serial motor skill. 
 
TRUE

 

Accessibility: Keyboard Navigation
Topic: Discussion; One-Dimension Classification Systems
 

 

37.

The size of a pen that a person uses to write is an example of a regulatory condition that will determine the movements required for the handwriting action. 
 
TRUE

 

Accessibility: Keyboard Navigation
Topic: Discussion; Gentile's Two-Dimensions Taxonomy
 

 

38.

Whether or not an object must be manipulated is a skill characteristic in Gentile's taxonomy of motor skills that is included in the "environmental context" dimension of the taxonomy. 
 
FALSE

 

Accessibility: Keyboard Navigation
Topic: Discussion; Gentile's Two-Dimensions Taxonomy
 

 

39.

Classifying skills into general categories helps us to understand the demands those skills place on the performer/learner. 
 
TRUE

 

Accessibility: Keyboard Navigation
Topic: Discussion; Skills, Actions, Movements, and Neuromotor Processes
 

 

40.

Skilled individuals are much less efficient than less skilled individuals. 
 
FALSE

 

Accessibility: Keyboard Navigation
Topic: Discussion; Skills, Actions, Movements, and Neuromotor Processes
 

 

41.

People learn movements rather than actions when they begin to learn or relearn a skill. 
 
FALSE

 

Accessibility: Keyboard Navigation
Topic: Discussion; Skills, Actions, Movements, and Neuromotor Processes
 

 

42.

The color of a ball is an example of a non-regulatory condition. 
 
TRUE

 

Accessibility: Keyboard Navigation
Topic: Discussion; Gentile's Two-Dimensions Taxonomy
 

 

43.

The motor system always recruits the same muscle fibers when executing a simple movement like lifting the arm. 
 
FALSE

 

Accessibility: Keyboard Navigation
Topic: Discussion; Skills, Actions, Movements, and Neuromotor Processes
 

 

44.

The terms actions and movements are interchangeable. 
 
FALSE

 

Accessibility: Keyboard Navigation
Topic: Discussion; Skills, Actions, Movements, and Neuromotor Processes
 

 

45.

A movement that can be used to accomplish many different action goals highlights the one-to-many relationship between movements and actions. 
 
TRUE

 

Accessibility: Keyboard Navigation
Topic: Discussion; Skills, Actions, Movements, and Neuromotor Processes
 

 

46.

An effective instructor would acknowledge that the best way to accomplish a task may vary from one individual to another. 
 
TRUE

 

Accessibility: Keyboard Navigation
Topic: Discussion; Skills, Actions, Movements, and Neuromotor Processes
 

 

47.

To distract a basketball free throw shooter, the fans from the opposing team wave their arms in the air. The waving arms are an example of a regulatory condition. 
 
FALSE

 

Accessibility: Keyboard Navigation
Topic: Discussion; Gentile's Two-Dimensions Taxonomy
 

 

48.

A physical therapist could use Gentile's taxonomy to evaluate a patient's capabilities and limitations. 
 
TRUE

 

Accessibility: Keyboard Navigation
Topic: Discussion; Gentile's Two-Dimensions Taxonomy